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Prince Gallitzin State Park

966 Marina Road
Patton, PA 16668

814-674-1000

At Prince Gallitzin State Park, the forested hills of the Allegheny Plateau cradle sprawling Glendale Lake. Vistas offer scenic views of the 1,635-acre lake with its 26 miles of shoreline, which is a favorite of anglers and boaters. Campers flock to the large campground and also enjoy hiking and other outdoor activities.

The varied habitats of the park make it a home for many types of wildlife, and a rest stop in the spring and fall migrations.

Hiking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

32.65 miles of trails

The trails pass through many habitats and near the lake.

McDermott Trail
0.8 mile, easiest hiking

This trail leads from a small parking area along Beaver Valley Road to Bosar Point, the peninsula that separates the Killbuck and Mud Lick fingers of Glendale Lake. The point is a great place to view spring waterfowl.

Haddie Buck Peninsula Trails (central)
Lakeshore Trail
0.75 mile, easiest hiking

Beginning between cabins 7 and 8, this forested walking trail runs along Glendale Lake and has several scenic views. At Muskrat Beach, the trail follows the service road to the group tenting area where it meets Hughes Trail.

Muskrat Beach Trail
0.5 mile, easiest hiking

This trail links Troxell Point and Plessinger trails to Muskrat Beach.

Plessinger Trail
1.2 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail leads from the Prince Gallitzin Marina entrance road to Muskrat Beach Day Use Area 1 and meets Muskrat Beach Trail.

Troxell Point Trail
2.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This long trail begins at the parking lot along Marina Road near the Pa. Game Commission maintenance building. This trail crosses the length of Haddie Buck Peninsula to Troxell Point. Many trails intersect Troxel Point Trail providing the opportunity for side loops and alternate pathways.

Turkey Ridge Trail
1.2 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail intersects Troxel Point Trail twice and passes through Day Use Area 3. Turkey Ridge Trail passes through a variety of habitats, offering the chance to see a wide variety of animal and bird species. The majority of the trail is relatively flat, making it a good family hike.

Hughes Trail
0.9 mile, more difficult hiking

This trail begins in the group tenting area and joins Troxell Point Trail.

Point Trailhead/Campground Trails (central west)
Deer Trail
0.7 mile, easiest hiking

Follow this trail into State Game Lands 108 to discover food plots for wildlife. Lucky hikers can see deer or other animals feeding. This trail intersects with Forest Trail.

Forest Trail
0.4 mile, easiest hiking

Watch scampering chipmunks and hear chattering red squirrels while strolling under a canopy of beech, maple, and hemlock trees. This short loop is one of the easiest trails in the park.

Footprint Trail
0.8 mile, more difficult hiking

Follow this loop for a fleeting view of the Wyerough Branch to the lake. Near the midway point, hikers can relax on the bench and scout for herons, osprey, and bald eagle.

Poems Trail
0.6 mile, easiest hiking

Learn about nature through poetry. Pick up a trail guide at the trailhead and follow this trail and read the poems that correspond with locations along the trail. This is an easy walking trail with many interesting poems about nature.

Point Trail
2.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This relatively rugged trail with lots of exposed roots begins at the Point Trailhead. The top loop of the trail follows Crooked Run Branch. The bottom loop of the trail follows the shoreline or a hillside. The trees are a mix of hemlock and hardwoods providing a shady walk.

Campground Trail
2.2 miles, easiest hiking

This trail follows the shoreline and topography around the campground. Five benches along the trail are great for relaxing and viewing wildlife. This trail is popular for mountain biking.

Shomo Fields Trails (north)
Rhody Trail
1.1 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail takes you through Dixon Hollow starting along Swartz Road and ending at Wyerough Finger. Make a loop by taking Herman Fields or Reed trails along the way.

Reed Trail
0.6 mile, more difficult hiking

This short trail connects Westrick Trail to Rhody Trail.

Westrick Trail
0.7 mile, more difficult hiking

This trail begins near Pavilion 1 at Pickerel Pond, crosses Beaver Valley Road and steadily climbs to Shomo Fields then intersects Herman Fields Trail.

Herman Fields Trail
0.7 mile, easiest hiking

Starting at an old road gate along Beaver Valley Road, this trail climbs the hill to join Rhody Trail and intersects with Westrick Trail along the way.

Gates Trail
2.2 miles, more difficult hiking

Accessed from Swartz Road or from Bollinger Trail near McKees Run Boat Launch, this trail loops around the hill above McKees Run.

Bollinger Trail
4.1 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail stretches from Pickerel Pond to Glendale Dam, passing Beaverdam Marina, the soccer field at Beaver Valley, and intersecting many trails. Mountain bikers, horseback riders, and snowmobilers all use the trail.

Bater Patch Trails (northeast)
Old Glendale Road Trail
1.9 miles, easiest hiking

This trail leads from the Glendale Dam across the dam and follows the shoreline along the Slate Lick arm of Glendale Lake to the Bater Patch Trailhead. Along the way it connects to Hagaratty Trail. This is a beautiful walk through the woods with great opportunities to see birds and wildlife.

Hagaratty Trail
1.5 miles, more difficult hiking

Starts near the Glendale Dam from the Old Glendale Road Trail and follows along Snake Ridge before descending to meet Old Glendale Road Trail at the Bater Patch Trailhead.

Slate Lick Trails (southeast)
Foster Run Trail
1.7 miles, more difficult hiking

This trail runs from the Bater Patch Trailhead south along a ridge and then down to the lake near Noel Run. This remote area of the park consists of thick brushy woods over rolling hills. During the summer this trail is used primarily for horseback riding, but is also open to hiking, mountain biking, and snowmobiling.

Noel Run Connector Trail
0.6 mile, more difficult hiking

This short connector tail connects Foster Run Trail to the Glendale Riding Trails. During the summer, this trail is used primarily for horseback riding, but is also open to hiking and snowmobiling.

Glendale Riding Trails
1.8 miles, more difficult hiking

This is a series of interloping trails that is primarily used as a horseback riding area for horseback riding concession. Some trails have heavy humps from many years of equestrian use. During the summer, the primary use is horseback riding and other users should be aware and yield to horses. The area consists of rolling terrain through woods with heavy underbrush.

Picnicking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Picnic tables are available throughout the park. Many picnic tables are adjacent to the swimming area in Muskrat Beaches #1, #2, and #3.

Four picnic pavilions may be reserved up to 11 months in advance for a fee. Unreserved picnic pavilions are free on a first-come, first-served basis.

Stay the Night at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Camping
flush toilets, warm showers, full hook-ups, electric hook-ups

This activity or structure is ADA accessible.
A 398-site tent and trailer campground is open from the second Friday in April to the last Monday in October.

Many sites have electric hook-ups. Some sites have full service hook up, which includes sewer, water, and electricity.

Facilities and services offered in the campground include:

Camp store with coin-operated laundry
Swimming beach
Boat mooring area
Boat rental
Playgrounds
Paved sites
Showers
Flush toilets
Sanitary dump stations
Wi-Fi within the Crooked Run Campground
The Campground Beach is open during the summer.

Swimming at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Muskrat beach is open from late-May to mid-September, from 8:00 A.M. until sunset.

Swim at your own risk. Please read and follow posted rules for swimming.

In and around the swimming area are:

Modern bathhouses
Dressing rooms
Disc golf
Volleyball courts
Large picnic area
Campers can swim at the Beach Campground in the campground.

Smoke-Free Beach
Smoking is prohibited on the beach and in the swimming area. For visitors who smoke and still want to use the beach, designated areas adjacent to the beach are provided. The restriction includes:

Cigarettes
Pipes
Cigars
E-cigarettes
Other handheld, lighted, smoking devices

Wildlife Watching at Prince Gallitzin State Park

The diverse habitats of Prince Gallitzin State Park provide great opportunities for viewing wildlife. Please observe wildlife from a distance and do not feed wildlife.

The 1,635-acre Glendale Lake, with its 26 miles of shoreline, is home to many species of fish, birds, and animals.

Wyerough Branch and the upper reaches of Slatelick and Mudlick branches are covered in wetland plants and are a good places to see:

Ducks
Herons
Rails
During the spring and fall, waterfowl stop at the lake to rest on their migrations north and south.

The forests of the park are excellent for seeing many species of birds, especially warblers and vireos.

The fields in the park are excellent for seeing butterflies. Prince Gallitzin State Park, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, has begun to enhance the Headache Hill area to improve wildlife diversity and create wildlife viewing areas.

Boating at Prince Gallitzin State Park

up to 20 hp motors permitted

The 1,635-acre Glendale Lake has nine public boat launching areas conveniently located throughout the park, along with three public mooring facilities for:

Sailboats
Pontoon boats
Runabouts
Marina slips are available at Beaver Valley and at Prince Gallitzin marinas.

Fishing at Prince Gallitzin State Park

The 1,635-acre Glendale Lake is a warmwater fishery.

The common gamefish are:

Bass
Pike
Muskellunge
Crappie
Bluegill
Perch
Killbuck Run is stocked with trout.

This activity or structure is ADA accessible. A fishing pier for people with disabilities is at Pickerel Pond.

Ice Fishing
The 1,635-acre Glendale Lake is popular for ice fishing. Common species caught through the ice are:

Perch
Walleye
Pike
Crappie
Ice thickness is not monitored.

Hunting at Prince Gallitzin State Park

During established seasons, about 5,900 acres are open to:

Hunting
Trapping
Training of dogs
Common game species are:

Deer
Turkey
Small game
Hunting woodchucks, also known as groundhogs, is prohibited. Dog training is only permitted from the day following Labor Day through March 31 in designated hunting areas.

DCNR and the Pennsylvania Game Commission rules and regulations apply. Complete information about hunting rules and regulations in Pennsylvania is available from the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

This activity or structure is ADA accessible. Contact the park office for ADA accessible hunting information.

Biking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

2.3 miles of trails

All bicyclists may use park roads open to public travel. Campers may cycle the 2.3-mile multi-use trail around the perimeter of the campground.

Mountain Biking at Prince Gallitzin State Park

20 miles of trails

In the northern part of the park, the 20-mile snowmobile trail network is open for mountain biking and hiking.

Bikers should follow the rules of the road and common courtesies.

Horseback Riding at Prince Gallitzin State Park

All equestrian trails can be accessed from the Beaver Valley Marina upper parking lot.

Disc Golfing at Prince Gallitzin State Park

An eighteen-hole, disc golf course is located around the Muskrat Beach #2 day use area. The course wraps through varied terrain and provides challenging shots in wooded and field areas.

Score cards and course maps can be picked up at the bulletin board at the far right of the parking area next to Tee #1.

Scenic views of Glendale Lake and surrounding areas of the park provide a tranquil place to recreate after disc golfing.

Cross-country Skiing at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Seven miles of marked trails are available for this popular wintertime activity.

Snowmobiling at Prince Gallitzin State Park

Registered snowmobiles may use the 20-mile trail network.

Snowmobiles may be operated on designated trails and roads from the day following the last deer season in December until April 1, weather permitting.

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