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Old Stone Fort State Park

732 Stone Fort Drive
Manchester, TN 37355

931-723-5073

The Old Stone Fort was built during the Middle Woodland Period, 1,500-2,000 years ago. Native Americans used this area continuously for about 500 years, eventually leaving it abandoned. By the time European settlers arrived, it was unclear of what the area had been used for which resulted in it being misnamed as a fort. In 1966, the state of Tennessee purchased 400 acres of the Chumley estate as the core of what is now Old Stone Fort State Archaeological Park.

The park is home to an abundance of activities for guests to enjoy. The main hiking trail follows the wall of Old Stone Fort which was used by the Native Americans as a ceremonial gathering place. The trail threads through dramatic scenery where you can see the original entrance of the fort which was designed to face the exact spot on the horizon where the sun rises during the summer solstice. Visitors can learn about the Old Stone Fort on this hike with twelve interpretive panels as well as enjoying the areas graceful waterfalls.


The Old Stone Fort attracts history enthusiasts from all over. The park’s museum consists of displays of prehistoric Native American replicas as well as dioramas and photos. The exhibits provide information on the theories regarding the enclosure’s builders, archaeological excavations at the site and the culture of its builders. There is also a small theater for viewing an orientation film and other videos as well as group presentations. The museum also houses the welcome center, park office and gift shop.

Activities

HIKING
Old Stone Fort has several miles of hiking trails at all levels of difficulty.

FISHING
The Bark Camp and Barren Forks of the Duck River as well the Duck River provide Largemouth Bass, bream and catfish. Fishing is good from the bank as well as by boat.

BIRDING
Birding during spring and fall migration of the canopy can be productive, and the northern parula and red-eyed vireo can be heard or seen throughout the summer as is the occasional wood duck.

Campground

Campers must cross our picturesque one-lane bridge to enter the campground. The bridge is 13½ feet tall and 11 feet wide. The weight limits are 10 tons for two axles and 18 tons for three axles.

There are 51 campsites with water and electrical hookups, grills, picnic tables and hard-surface pads that can accommodate a unit up to 50 feet in length. A dump station is open year-round. One of the two restroom facilities includes showers, however, that building is not open during the off-season, thus showers are not available at that time. Firewood can be purchased at the park. The stay limit is two weeks.

Campsites are heavily wooded with separation between the sites. Camping is equally popular by both RV’s and tents/pop-ups. While the campground has a remote feel, it is actually within 10 minutes of a variety of restaurants. Also, a Manchester public pool is within one mile of the campground.

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