Montgomery City Public Library

224 North Allen Street
Montgomery City, MO 63361

573-564-8022
History:

Compiled by Mrs. John Gilmer Miller, Sr. in November, 1972 The opening of the free Public Library in Montgomery City was an important event in the history of our town, and owes its foundation and its survival to a relatively few individuals who had vision and extraordinary determination.

The work for the library was actually begun in 1926 at Delphian Society (a study club) meeting in the Directors Room of the Montgomery County Bank. A desire to do something needed and worthwhile for our town prompted the movement.

The history of the library can best be told not by a recital of a few cold facts but by a review and study of the actions of those few women who launched this successful movement. The Delphian roll of membership at that time included Mrs. Everett Barton, Mrs. D. J. Bentley, Mrs. Eugene Mabry, Mrs. E. P. Shay, Mrs. C. K. Sheets, Sr., Mrs. T. R. Hancock, Mrs. George Vogt, Mrs. Raymond Reid, Mrs. Alice McCann, Mrs. C. C. Walls, and Mrs. John G. Miller, Sr.

The project required foresight, and required as well, optimism to a remarkable degree.

The Delphian members worked to create a library fund. A candy sale netted $21.70; assessments and personal donations $37.75 and home talent musical revue "Zig-Zag Revue" presented February 14 and 15, 1927, at the old Opera House (now the Masonic Hall) netted $125.71. The following year, January 24 and 25, 1928, a second revue "Fads and Fancies" was presented. The accompanist for plays was Miss Virginia Jones. The programs are still available.

Mrs. J. G. Miller secured a substantial gift of books from the St. Louis Public Library. An appeal was made to our citizens for donations of books and their response was generous. New books were purchased. Later a gift of fifty books was given by Mrs. Jerry Miller of High Hill, Missouri.

On May 11, 1927 the Library was formally opened in the City Hall room, upstairs in the Mrs. Julia Gill building, now occupied by Attorneys McQuie and Deiter. There were 700 volumes on the shelves insured for $1,000.00. In August, 1938, the library was removed from its upstairs quarters in the late S. S. Nowlin building to quarters in the Community Building on North Sturgeon Street.

Due to the great interest in the library it was decided that a permanent Library Association should be organized.

At a mass meeting at the Court House, July 29, 1927, the association was formed. Mayor M. F. See called the meeting to order. Mrs. J. F. Ball was elected President; M. F. See, Vice President; Mrs. Albert Guy, Secretary; and E. B. Spears, Treasurer; Book Committee, Mrs. John G. Miller, Mrs. Lucy Hensley, M. F. See.

From May 1, 1927 to May 1, 1928 there were 318 registered readers and a book circulation of 2,870 volumes. The work of invoicing, cataloguing and lending books was donated.

The library grew and prospered to such extent that the Library Association members petitioned the City Council to call an election to vote a mill tax levy for maintenance of the free public library. The proposition was voted upon at a special election held May 22, 1928. The proposition won by a majority of 29 votes.

The members of the Library Association met at the home of Mrs. J. F. Ball on June 16, 1928 for the purpose of organization of a permanent Library Board as required by statute. The drawing for board membership was as follows: one year, Mrs. Elmer Brinegar; Mrs. E. P. Shay, Mrs. D. J. Bentley; two years, Miss Katie Rosenberger, Mrs. T. R. Hancock, Mrs. J. F. Ball; three years, Mrs. George Vogt, Mrs. George Jones, Mrs. John G. Miller.

The officers and committees were as follows: President, Mrs. James F. Ball; Vice President, Mrs. John G. Miller; Secretary, Mrs. D. J. Bentley; By-laws, Mrs. E. P. Shay, Miss Katie Rosenberger, Mrs. Elmer Brinegar; Book Committee, Mrs. John G. Miller, Mrs. T. R. Hancock, Mrs. I. C. Uptegrove; Finance, Mrs. George Vogt, Mrs. D. J. Bentley, Mrs. George Jones, Mrs. E. P. Shay; Librarian, Mrs. I. C. Uptegrove; Assistant-Librarian, Miss Edwina Owings.

In September, 1928 arrangements were made for a branch library at Lincoln Park School, the school now closed to conform with federal desegregation laws. Mrs. Ella Drain Taylor had charge of the books at Lincoln Park.

The affairs of the Library are managed by a board of nine members appointed by the Mayor, and are limited by law to nine consecutive years. Mention should be made of the longest service of a Board member, that of Mrs. Charles Schneider, who served for twenty-eight consecutive years and retired due to a new Missouri statue limiting service on a Library Board to nine consecutive years. She was a dedicated worker!

On April 2, 1929, an election was held to repeal the mill tax for the maintenance of the Public Library. The tax levy carried by a large majority, the vote being 323 for the levy and 163 against. "It seemed to be the general opinion that the vote would be close....but when the votes were counted it was found that the levy had carried by nearly two to one....The victory for the library tax was due entirely to the splendid work done by the ladies who organized for the purpose. If ever we have an itch to run for office, before announcing we are going to see if we can get them to manage our campaign. We all have to take off our hats to them, and whether for or against the levy, we have to acknowledge they are efficient campaigners."
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