Inside the Mind of a Master Con-Artist: How to Protect Yourself Online

Posted on 09/25/20 by Cindy Campbell

Called 'The Original Internet Godfather' by the United States Secret Service, Brett Johnson built and ran the first organized cybercrime community - Shadowcrew. Brett Johnson was responsible for refining modern financial cybercrime as we know it today. After being placed on the United States Most Wanted List, captured and convicted of 39 felonies, Brett promptly escaped prison. Captured again, Brett served his time, accepted responsibility, and found redemption through his loved ones and the help of the FBI. Today he is considered a leading authority on internet crime, identity theft, and cybersecurity. Brett speaks and consults across the planet to help protect people and organizations from the type of person he used to be.

Deep within the internet is the Dark Web, a space where criminals can anonymously buy and sell illegal goods and private information. Known as the “Original Internet Godfather,” Brett Johnson created one of the dark web’s first online stores where criminals bought stolen credit cards, Social Security numbers, drugs and guns. After serving seven years in prison, Brett turned his back on criminal enterprise and became a consultant for the Secret Service and the cybersecurity industry. Want to get a rare look inside the mind of a master con-artist? Join AARP’s Northeast states as Brett Johnson reveals how he became a con man and why he changed his ways. You’ll learn how to protect yourself from cybercriminals and you’ll have the opportunity to ask questions alongside people from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont.

Register here.

This story is provided by AARP Massachusetts. Visit the AARP Massachusetts page for more news, events, and programs affecting retirement, health care, and more.

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