How to Vote in Arizona’s 2022 Elections

Posted on 11/15/21 by Emily Paulin

En español | Arizona’s Aug. 2 primaries will determine which candidates appear on November’s general election ballots for governor, U.S. House and Senate, and several state offices. New state laws passed in 2021 made changes to voting protocols, introducing requirements to stay on the early-voting list and fixing a mail-in ballot without a correct signature. Some of the changes are currently being challenged in the courts.

Note that court challenges and the new legislative session may lead to additional changes in Arizona's voting laws before the primary and general elections, so be sure to check back for up-to-date information.

  • All registered voters can request a ballot by mail and vote from home for August’s primaries and November’s general election.     
  • Each county offers early in-person voting options for both elections, starting 27 days before Election Day and running through 5 p.m. on the Friday before Election Day. 
  • The state’s primary election is Tuesday, Aug. 2; the general election is Tuesday, Nov. 8. Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.


How do I register to vote?

Voter registration applications must be submitted at least 29 days prior to an election. You can register:

  • Online: Use the Service Arizona Voter Registration Portal to register, check your registration status or change your party affiliation. The deadline to register is July 5 for the primaries and Oct. 11 for the general election.
  • In person: Visit your county recorder’s office. Alternatively, you can register at motor vehicle division (MVD) offices, state public assistance and disability agencies (including the Family Assistance Administration, Health Care Cost Containment System, Department of Health Services, Department of Economic Security, Developmental Disabilities Division, plus more), armed forces recruiting centers and local libraries.

You can check if you are registered to vote through the Arizona Voter Information Portal.

Across The U.S. Voters Flock To The Polls On Election Day

If you are a victim of domestic violence, sexual offenses or stalking, you can meet with a registered application assistant to see if you qualify as a ACP (address confidentiality program) protected voter, which ensures your real address does not appear on any public registered voter lists that may be made public. Participants are strongly encouraged not to register to vote through any other process other than through the ACP. Call 602-542-1653 for assistance.   

Does my party affiliation matter when I vote?


If you are registered with a political party, you are only permitted to vote in that party’s primary. You will automatically be sent or issued the appropriate primary election ballot.

Arizona has an open primary that allows any voter who is registered as independent to cast a ballot in one of the officially recognized parties’ primaries. Counties will mail out a notice 90 days before the primaries, asking independent voters to choose which party ballot they wish to receive. Voters must return this notice by mail at least 45 days prior to the election to receive their preferred party’s ballot automatically by mail. All ballots by mail are sent out 27 days prior to Election Day.

If you miss this deadline, you can still request a designated party ballot be sent to you by mail, up to 11 days prior to Election Day (July 22). You can make this request to your county recorder's office by phone, email or mail.

Independent voters may also go to an in-person early voting location, or to the polls on Election Day, and request the political party ballot of their choice.

How can I get a mail-in ballot? Are there important deadlines?


Any registered voter can request a ballot by mail and vote safely from home in the August primaries and in November’s general election. In fact, most Arizonans vote by mail.

Registered voters can receive a ballot by mail by signing up to be on the Active Early Voting List (previously called the Permanent Early Voting List) — which means you will be sent a ballot by mail for all elections in which you are eligible to vote. Note that a new law says that voters may be removed from the Active Early Voting List if they fail to use their early ballot at least once in two straight two-year election cycles. Prior to removal, voters will be sent a notice from their county recorder’s office asking if they want to remain on the early voting list.

You can sign up for the Active Early Voting List when you register to vote. Or, if you’re already registered, you can sign up:

  • By mail: Print, complete and sign the Active Early Voting List request form, and then mail, fax or email a scanned copy or photo of the completed form to your county recorder's office. If you do not have a printer, write out the required information from the request form, sign the document that you wrote, then mail, fax or email a scanned copy or photo of your handwritten request instead.

You can join the Active Early Voting List at any time, but to get a ballot by mail for the primaries or the general election, you must sign up by 5 p.m. at least 11 days before Election Day, which is July 22 for the primaries and Oct. 28 for the general election.


Alternatively, you can request a one-time ballot by mail:

  • By phone: Call your county recorder's office. You must provide your name, date of birth, residence address and other identifying information.
  • By mail: Print, complete and sign the ballot-by-mail request form, and then mail, fax or email a scanned copy or photo of the completed form to your county recorder's office. If you do not have a printer, write out the required information from the request form, sign the document that you wrote, then mail, fax or email a scanned copy or photo of your handwritten request instead.
  • By email: Email your county recorder's office with the information outlined on the state’s Vote by Mail webpage under the subtitle “Option 4: send an email to your county recorder.”

To get a onetime ballot by mail for the primaries or the general election, you must sign up by 5 p.m. at least 11 days before Election Day, which is July 22 for the primaries and Oct. 28 for the general election. You can request a ballot for the general election when requesting one for the primaries.  


Once you’ve completed the actual ballot by mail, you can return it:

  • By mail: Use the prepaid envelope included in your ballot-by-mail package. The state recommends mailing it seven days before Election Day to ensure it reaches your county election officials on time. So drop your ballot in the mail by July 26 for the primaries and by Nov. 1 for the general election.
  • In person: Drop off your ballot at any ballot drop box, drop-off location, early voting site or Election Day polling location in your county. If you return your ballot by mail on Election Day, you can skip the lines and turn it in at any polling location within your county. Poll workers will show you where to drop off your ballot. Find all voting and drop-off locations on your county government’s website.

Whether you return your ballot by mail or drop it off in person, all ballots must be received by 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Can I track my absentee ballot?

 
Yes. Every ballot by mail will have a unique identifier to allow voters and election officials to track it after it arrives at the country recorder’s office. Counties, which are responsible for tabulating votes, have processes that prevent voters from voting twice and will typically only count the first one received. Visit My.Arizona.Vote to check your ballot’s status.

Voters in Maricopa County can also receive automatic updates on their ballot-by-mail status via text message. Simply text the word "JOIN" to 628-683 or visit TextSignUp.Maricopa.Vote to subscribe.

Can I vote in person before Election Day?


Each county in Arizona has different in-person early voting options, starting 27 days before Election Day and running through 5 p.m. on the Friday before Election Day. For the primaries, early in-person voting begins on July 6 and finishes on July 29. For the general election, it begins Oct. 12 and ends Nov. 4. Directly contact or visit the website of your county recorder to learn more about early in-person voting locations. The county recorder’s office will be one option, but others will vary from county to county.

Voters are required to present sufficient identification to vote early in-person.

When is Election Day? When are polls open?

  
The primary elections will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 2, and the general election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

You can locate your assigned polling place through the state’s Voter Information Portal. If you are still unable to locate your polling place, you may contact your county recorder's office.

If you have been issued a ballot by mail but decide to vote at the polls on Election Day, you may be directed to vote with a provisional ballot. You must affirm you have not already voted and will not submit your ballot by mail, or you must surrender the ballot by mail to the poll worker.

What is a provisional ballot?


A provisional ballot is given to voters at an in-person voting location if they are unable to provide a valid form of identification or are not on the polling location’s roster. This could occur if you recently moved and did not update your voter information in time, if you requested an early ballot by mail or if your voter registration is not active.

Your provisional ballot will be valid and counted as long you provide valid identification to your polling location before 7 p.m. on Election Day or to your county recorder's office by 5 p.m. on the fifth business day following Election Day — which is Aug. 9 for the primaries and Nov. 15 for the general election.

Note that members of federally recognized tribes are not required to have an address or photo on their tribal identification in order to cast a provisional ballot.

What if I need assistance casting my vote?


All voting locations have been chosen with special needs voters in mind. Each polling location will provide handicap parking and be able to accommodate individuals in wheelchairs as well as individuals with visual or hearing impairments. All voting locations must also have an accessible voting device for use by voters with disabilities and trained poll workers who can assist individuals. 

Curbside voting is also available at many voting locations for voters who are unable to enter the polling location or voting center. Just ask that a ballot be brought to you by a poll worker.

If individuals are unable to sign or fully complete election materials, they may be assisted by a third party of their choice, other than the voter’s employer or union representative or a candidate appearing on the ballot. If a voter requires assistance to complete a ballot by mail, the ballot affidavit contains a section to designate the assistant’s name and address. If voters require assistance on Election Day at a polling place, they can request assistance from either a third party or members of the election board who are present at the voting location. In this situation, two board members of different political parties will assist.

Do I need identification to vote?


Yes. When you arrive to vote at the polls on Election Day, you must announce your name and place of residence to the election official and present one form of photo identification from List 1, such as a valid Arizona driver license, nonoperating ID card or tribal enrollment card; or two different forms of identification from List 2 or List 3, such as a recent utility bill or bank statement, valid Arizona vehicle registration or Indian census card.

Valid identification is also required prior to receiving a ballot at any early in-person voting location or emergency vote center, or from a special election board.

If you are unable to provide a valid form of identification, or if you are not on the polling location’s roster, you can still vote a provisional ballot (see above).

What races are on the ballot?

  • U.S. Senate: 1 of 2 seats
  • U.S. House: all 9 seats 
  • State Senate: all 30 seats 
  • State House: all 60 seats 
  • Governor 
  • State executive seats, including attorney general, secretary of state and more


Editor’s note: This guide was updated on Nov. 15 with information about how to vote in 2022. The guide was first published on July 30, 2020. Voting rules, procedures and candidates may change before Election Day. We’ll keep this guide updated, so bookmark this page and check back. 

Also of Interest:

This story is provided by AARP Arizona. Visit the AARP Arizona page for more news, events, and programs affecting retirement, health care, and more.

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